London Docklands

London docklands
London docklands

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London dockland

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London docklands

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London Docklands

 

London Docklands in London is consisted of boroughs Southwark, Tower Hamlets, Newham and Greenwich. When it was still a part of the London Port, it was once the largest port in the world but it has separated and paved ways to the development of commercial and residential areas. In 1971, the London Docklands name was officially used for the place.

Dock complexes in the London Docklands from west to east are the following: St Katharine Docks, London Docks, Limehouse Basin, Surrey Quays, West India Docks, Millwall Dock, Poplar Dock, East India Docks, Royal Victoria Dock, Royal Albert Dock and King George V Dock.

Redevelopments in the Docklands have resulted to the area’s population boom, doubling in the past two years, with major business centers continuously built and transport links improved. One of Europe’s tallest skyscrapers, the Canary Wharf, is located in the Docklands. However, Dockland’s being a symbol of Thatcher’s Britain makes it a common target for terrorists, with failed attempts on the Canary Wharf on 1996.

Journalism in the Docklands is at its peak with its own weekly newspaper, “The Docklands” launched in 2006.

London Docklands has been referred by authors Charles Dickens (in his novels Our Mutual Friend and Great Expectations) and Joseph Conrad (The Mirror of the Sea). The area was also used as a setting location for one of the scenes in the film 28 Weeks Later.